Friday - Nov 16, 2018

Frontpage

  • When the river turned yellow

    When the river turned yellow

    by David Bacon In the afternoon of Aug. 6, 2014, the water in the Bacanuchi River turned yellow. At Tahuichopa, where the Bacanuchi flows into the larger Sonora River, Martha Agupira was one of the first to see it. “We had no warning,” she remembers. “We just saw the river change color-yellow, with a really

  • Uprooted in Mexico: the US children ‘returned’ to a country they berely know

    Uprooted in Mexico: the US children ‘returned’ to a country they berely know

    At least half a million US citizens have enrolled in Mexican schools since 2010 amid a wave of deportations and voluntary repatriations by Nina Lakhani and Monica Jacobo SANTIAGO JUXTLAHUACA, Oaxaca – After 14 years as an undocumented farmworker in the US, Julia Aguilar returned to Mexico last year with her two sons, both of

  • “No touching” through the border’s iron bars

    “No touching” through the border’s iron bars

    by David Bacon It took two days on the bus for Catalina Cespedes and her husband Teodolo Torres to get from their hometown in Puebla – Santa Monica Cohetzala – to Tijuana. On a bright Sunday in May they went to the beach at Playas de Tijuana. There the wall separating Mexico from the United

  • Aging in the fields  – no alternative but to keep working – Part 1

    Aging in the fields – no alternative but to keep working – Part 1

    by David Bacon As soon as  Anastasia Flores’ children were old enough, she brought them with her to work in the fields. “Ever since 1994 I’ve always worked by myself, until my children  could also work,” she recalls. “In Washington, I picked cucumbers, and in Santa Maria here I worked picking strawberries and tomatoes. In

  • Why are Mexican teachers being jailed for protesting the education reform?

    Why are Mexican teachers being jailed for protesting the education reform?

    by David Bacon LATEST BULLETIN:  On Sunday, June 19, Federal armed forces in Oaxaca fired on teachers and supporters in the Mixteca town of Nochixtlan, and at press time, it had killed at least a dozen people and wounded several dozens more. On Sunday night, June 12, as Ruben Núñez, head of Oaxaca’s teachers union,

  • The fight isn’t over for farmworkers overtime work hours pay

    The fight isn’t over for farmworkers overtime work hours pay

    by David Bacon For the state’s first hundred-plus years, certain unspoken rules governed California politics. In a state where agriculture produced more wealth than any industry, the first rule was that growers held enormous power. Tax dollars built giant water projects that turned the Central and Imperial Valleys into some of the nation’s most productive

  • Community development pushes back against  profiteers in the Mission

    Community development pushes back against profiteers in the Mission

    by Josh Wolf After catching fire three times and being razed to the ground, the lot at 22nd and Mission Street holds two possible futures that evoke the two competing trajectories for the future of the Mission. MEDA, a non-profit community developer, has made multiple offers to buy the property to build affordable housing, but

  • Teaching violence – how US police went from Mayberry to madness

    Teaching violence – how US police went from Mayberry to madness

    The question is: How to stop it by Claire Bernish Policing in the United States metamorphosed drastically over the last few decades after the NDAA in 1990 allowed departments to obtain surplus military equipment free of charge. With the weapons and gear of war likewise came the warrior ethos. Though unprepared to handle accouterments of the

  • The Revolt of the Chapulines

    The Revolt of the Chapulines

    by David Bacon Chapulines are small insects, like grasshoppers.  When they’re toasted with lime and garlic, they’re a delicacy that’s as much a part of Oaxacan indigenous culture as mezcal or big tlayuda tortillas.   One worker standing in line in the edge of a San Joaquin Valley blueberry field laughed at the name.  “We’re

  • Civil rights and anti-war movements

    Civil rights and anti-war movements

    How activism developed in Santa Clara Valley by David Bacon In the 1960s the upsurge of the civil rights and anti-war movements transformed the politics and social movements of the Santa Clara Valley. In part, this reflected growing population and changing demographics. In 1950 Santa Clara County’s population was 290,000, and 12 percent were people