Thursday - Sep 20, 2018

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  • Why politics matters?

    Why politics matters?

    There can be no health freedom, food freedom and medical freedom without political freedom by Mike Adams Opinión Every Natural News reader agrees on the fundamental principles of health freedom, food freedom and medical freedom. We all believe in the basic human right to grow our own food, save seeds, choose the medical treatments of

  • Farmworker overtime bill heads for another vote

    Farmworker overtime bill heads for another vote

    by David Bacon The fight for farm worker overtime is going down to the wire in California’s current legislative session, which will adjourn at the end of August. And as Assembly Bill 1066, which would require it, moves through the legislature, Jewish and African American organizations have made a commitment to win the votes it

  • Rigged election?

    Rigged election?

    A history of presidential candidates who’ve made allegations by Fred Lucas The current election is not the first time a candidate has charged that the game was rigged. The new book, Tainted by Suspicion: The Secret Deals and Electoral Chaos of Disputed Presidential Elections, delves into the common thread regarding the most controversial presidential elections

  • Nearly 3 million gallons of toxic one mine fall on Mexican River

    Nearly 3 million gallons of toxic one mine fall on Mexican River

    by David Bacon Editor’s note: This is a continuation of last week When the river turned yellow In the late 1980s, the administration of President Carlos Salinas de Gortari first declared the Cananea mine bankrupt, and then sold it to the Larrea family’s Grupo Mexico for $475 million in 1990. That’s the equivalent of the

  • When the river turned yellow

    When the river turned yellow

    by David Bacon In the afternoon of Aug. 6, 2014, the water in the Bacanuchi River turned yellow. At Tahuichopa, where the Bacanuchi flows into the larger Sonora River, Martha Agupira was one of the first to see it. “We had no warning,” she remembers. “We just saw the river change color-yellow, with a really

  • Uprooted in Mexico: the US children ‘returned’ to a country they berely know

    Uprooted in Mexico: the US children ‘returned’ to a country they berely know

    At least half a million US citizens have enrolled in Mexican schools since 2010 amid a wave of deportations and voluntary repatriations by Nina Lakhani and Monica Jacobo SANTIAGO JUXTLAHUACA, Oaxaca – After 14 years as an undocumented farmworker in the US, Julia Aguilar returned to Mexico last year with her two sons, both of

  • “No touching” through the border’s iron bars

    “No touching” through the border’s iron bars

    by David Bacon It took two days on the bus for Catalina Cespedes and her husband Teodolo Torres to get from their hometown in Puebla – Santa Monica Cohetzala – to Tijuana. On a bright Sunday in May they went to the beach at Playas de Tijuana. There the wall separating Mexico from the United

  • Aging in the fields  – no alternative but to keep working – Part 1

    Aging in the fields – no alternative but to keep working – Part 1

    by David Bacon As soon as  Anastasia Flores’ children were old enough, she brought them with her to work in the fields. “Ever since 1994 I’ve always worked by myself, until my children  could also work,” she recalls. “In Washington, I picked cucumbers, and in Santa Maria here I worked picking strawberries and tomatoes. In

  • Why are Mexican teachers being jailed for protesting the education reform?

    Why are Mexican teachers being jailed for protesting the education reform?

    by David Bacon LATEST BULLETIN:  On Sunday, June 19, Federal armed forces in Oaxaca fired on teachers and supporters in the Mixteca town of Nochixtlan, and at press time, it had killed at least a dozen people and wounded several dozens more. On Sunday night, June 12, as Ruben Núñez, head of Oaxaca’s teachers union,

  • The fight isn’t over for farmworkers overtime work hours pay

    The fight isn’t over for farmworkers overtime work hours pay

    by David Bacon For the state’s first hundred-plus years, certain unspoken rules governed California politics. In a state where agriculture produced more wealth than any industry, the first rule was that growers held enormous power. Tax dollars built giant water projects that turned the Central and Imperial Valleys into some of the nation’s most productive