Wednesday - Feb 20, 2019

Calendar & Tourism

  • WWII veterans brought leadership skills back home

    by Kenneth Burt

    The harsh reality that politics and war are intertwined is evident in the decision of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus to pressure filmmaker Ken Burns to include Latinos in his PBS documentary on World War II.

    Latinos were part of conflict from the beginning as the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor claimed the life of Rudolf Martínez of San Diego. Valor on the battlefields of Asia and Europe was widely recognized and Latinos won more Congressional Medals of Honor than any other ethnic group.

  • It’s time for a new Ellis Island

    by Cecilio Morales

    Since parity in health care was good enough for Republicans at a recent presidential debate, perhaps their anti-immigrant followers ought to consider parity for today’s immigrants. Immigration restrictions today should be no greater than they were when the majority of this country’s forbears came.

  • Hillary stresses human factor in himispheric trade

    by José de la Isla

    MIAMI BEACH — U.S. Senator Hillary Clinton sees the human factor as topmost in confronting hemispheric trade and immigration issues.

    In an exclusive interview with this correspondent the morning after she participated in the Univisión-sponsored Democratic Party presidential primary debate here, Clinton took the opportunity to expand on these two issues of major interest to 49 million U.S Hispanics and nearly 400 million more in some two dozen countries south of our border.

  • It’s time for a new Ellis Island

    by Cecilio Morales

    Since parity in health care was good enough for Republicans at a recent presidential debate, perhaps their anti-immigrant followers ought to consider parity for today’s immigrants. Immigration restrictions today should be no greater than they were when the majority of this country’s forbears came.

  • Mexico — beautiful, beloved and broke –– except for Carlos Slim

    by Andy Porras

       México lindo y querido — beautiful and beloved, as the old ballad proclaims — is also a land of depressing disparity. It is, as a recent study sizes up, almost 50 percent dirt poor.

       Then, too, Mexico is the home of the world’s richest man, Carlos Slim Helu. His family came to Mexico from Lebanon just before the 1911 Mexican Revolution.  

       Is there something wrong with this picture? Many Mexicans, rich or poor, think so.

  • Once again, GOP ignores its expanding ‘Hispanic deficit’

    by Raúl Reyes

       From César Chávez’s 1960s boycotts to the immigrants rights movements of today, Sí se puede has long been a stock phrase in Hispanic politics.  While it translates as “Yes, we can,” the real message has always been greater.  Sí se puede means we’ll fight the good fight, we’ll persevere, we’ll never give up.  

       These three words are routinely invoked everywhere from high school assemblies to presidential campaigns.  It’s the Latino call to action.

  • The other drug war

    by José de la Isla

    MEXICO CITY — Not everyone knows but perhaps they should. The New World people conquered Europe beginnin­g in the 16th century with their fresh fruits, vegetables, condiments and confections. Sugar was one of them.

    The other thing that most of us don’t think about too much is that sugar became as addictive as heroin. It went from a luxury to a necessity to a mind- and body-altering food. Over the last five centuries, sugar consumption has come to be virtually measured in terms of mountains instead of teaspoons.

  • After marathon meeting, ken burns, Latinos come to terms

    by José de la Isla

    In what some key advocates view as a major breakthrough in the Latino community’s confrontation with PBS over Ken Burns’ upcoming TV documentary on World War II, Burns has approved a five-point statement agreeing to add new material on Hispanic veterans within the body of the documentary, significantly changing his 14-hour film.

    The documentary, titled "The War," consists of seven two-hour segments. It is scheduled to air beginning Sept. 23.

  • The Mexican bar exam – Isabel’s choice

    by Adam Saytanides

    MEXICO CITY – Mexico has to clean up corruption before the nation can develop its economy, confront organized crime, and staunch the flow of immigrants north. But this won’t happen overnight.

    The practice of paying a mordida, or bribe, is just too deeply ingrained.

    In Mexico, it seems to seep into every aspect of life.

  • A chance to share in the American dream

    by Ricardo Sánchez

    Following massive demonstrations across the country in 2006 for comprehensive immigration reform, the most visible result has been militarization of the border, Congressional approval of a 700-mile fence between the United States and Mexico, and a more tentative, nervous U.S. Congress.